PW Español




PW Live



Very usefull links



PW
Bookstore





Institutional
links


OPEC







PW
Business Partners

 


IRAQ OIL THE FORUM

 


Blogspots

The Global Barrel

Tiempo Cultural

Gustavo Coronel

Iran Watch.org

Le Blog des
Energies Nouvelles

News Links

AP

AFP

Aljazeera

Dow Jones

Reuters


Bloomberg

Views and News
from Norway

 

 

 


Editorial/Opinion

 

 

 

Roberto Saviano: An unexpected place
for lessons to fight Mexico's mafia: Italy

 

 

At this moment, the fiercest, most powerful criminal organizations in the world are located in Mexico. Recent events should leave no one with any doubts.

On Sept. 26, 43 trainee teachers in the southwestern city of Iguala were abducted by the police and, according to the government, were most likely murdered by drug traffickers. Their deaths, which are the latest in a long list of bloody gang-related murders, sparked widespread riots in Mexico City. According to Amnesty International, 136,100 people were killed by Mexican cartels between December 2006 and May 2014 alone.

So how is Mexico to deal with this formidable problem? Perhaps it could look to Italy for lessons on how a deeply entrenched mafia.

Why Italy?

Italy is the country with the oldest mafia in the world—indeed, the very word mafia has Italian origins. But ever since the 1980s and early 1990s, when the Italian mafia was planting bombs on highways to kill state magistrates, mafia-related homicides have nose-dived. Between 1992 and 2012, murders related to organized crime dropped around 80 percent, according to the United Nations.

According to one mafia expert, the “radical and painful” changes seen in the decline of mafia groups in southern Italy “are the best proof of the effectiveness of anti-mafia law enforcement.”

Some might counter that Mexico does not have a mafia problem. After all, the Mexican cartels are often simply referred to as “drug traffickers.”

However, the most recent report of the U.S. State Department has estimated that the amount of money laundered annually in Mexico is between $19 and $29 billion. Such data suggests that continuing to merely call them drug traffickers is neither accurate nor, indeed, responsible.

To launder that amount of money, one has to be a mafia organization. These groups do more than merely produce and sell drugs — they reinvest profits in real estate, businesses and stocks. In addition, the groups also have a pyramid structure and employ financial consultants and accountants, which is typical of mafia organizations.

To date, Mexico has primarily used military crackdowns to fight its mafia. This has not resolved the situation, and, in some cases, has even worsened it by leading to a significant increase in ferocity and defections.

 

Here are three lessons Italy can teach Mexico from its own battles:

1-      Design better mafia laws

At the moment, Mexico is attempting to overhaul its judiciary and police. President Enrique Pena Nieto announced a 10-point plan last week, which includes empowering the central government to dissolve local governments believed to be infiltrated by the mafia. Similar laws were passed in Italy, and have been used to dissolve local governments of southern cities like Reggio Calabria.

Nieto's plans do not go far enough in their restructuring of the legal system. Mexico still relies on its Federal Law Against Organized Crime, passed in 1996, to investigate, prosecute, try, sentence and enforce penalties for organized crime. The law is not very effective, mainly because it only provides for sentencing individuals who “ aim ” to commit specific crimes, and are effectively aware of the criminal projects that they are a part of.

The problem is that, in many cases, people linked to the mafia do not know what purpose their “work” serves. This is because the very survival of criminal organizations rests right on their pyramid structure, where sensitive information is restricted to those at the top.

Mexico's current law needs to be bolstered by a provision on ‘criminal association,' as was developed by Italy's famous Rognoni-La Torre law of 1992, which introduced the crime of “mafia conspiracy,” which made it a crime to be part of a mafia organization, regardless of whether or not one takes part in other criminal activity.

2. Set up a national body to help prosecutors

Before being killed by a mafia-orchestrated bomb attack in 1992, Giovanni Falcone, the magistrate and brain behind Italy's anti-mafia laws, developed a series of essential tools to investigate, prosecute and judge the mafia.

An anti-drug department alone cannot investigate all the crimes that are committed in the universe of mafia organizations. Various regional, investigative bodies must coordinate domestically to unravel organized crime and combat it.

In 1992, Italy set up the National Anti-Mafia Office, a body of Italian magistrates dealing exclusively with cases related to organized crime. They facilitate communication and coordination between the various prosecutors working on mafia crimes.

Another essential organ is the Anti-Mafia Investigation Department, which does valuable intelligence work on the ground.

These bodies are the foundation of Italy's anti-mafia investigative system. When cases get lost in the vast sea of criminal offenses, it allows organizations to thrive in the shadows. These anti-mafia organizations help to prevent that from happening.

3. Confiscate property

Another lesson from Italy is the value of seizing and  confiscating property  of people belonging to a mafia conspiracy, including relatives, partners, cohabitants who may have played the role of “front man” or covered-up for the mafia.

The government passes on confiscated assets to civil society groups who use them for schools and other socially beneficial purposes.

Of course, all of the above legal instruments and tools take time to erect and properly use. They are not guaranteed to work all of the time, or eradicate the problem entirely.

Although violent crimes related to the mafia have decreased dramatically in Italy, that is not to say that the mafia organizations themselves have been dismantled. Indeed, they are still very much part of the Italian society and economy, as is evidenced by ongoing scandals .

Still, if Mexico can achieve the progress Italy has in the past decade, that would be a success worth celebrating.

For now, it is time to acknowledge that the current military response in Mexico simply isn't working.

With criminal organizations that are highly sophisticated and complex, guns and heavy artillery are not always the best way to harm them.

Sometimes, the law is the most powerful weapon of all.


Roberto Saviano is an Italian writer and journalist. He is the author of "Gomorrah," the bestselling book about the Neapolitan mafia. For the past 8 years, he has lived under police protection because of death threats against him made by the mafia. The film Gomorrah, based on the book, won the Gran Prix at Cannes in 2008. Petroleumworld does not necessarily share these views.

Editor's Note: This commentary was originally published by The Reuters news services, on 12/04/2014. Petroleumworld reprint this article in the interest of our readers.

All comments posted and published on Petroleumworld, do not reflect either for or against the opinion expressed in the comment as an endorsement of Petroleumworld. All comments expressed are private comments and do not necessary reflect the view of this website. All comments are posted and published without liability to Petroleumworld.

Use Notice:This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of issues of environmental and humanitarian significance. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml.

All works published by Petroleumworld are in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.Petroleumworld has no affiliation whatsoever with the originator of this article nor is Petroleumworld endorsed or sponsored by theoriginator.

Petroleumworld encourages persons to reproduce, reprint, or broadcast Petroleumworld articles provided that any such reproduction identify the original source, http://www.petroleumworld.com or else and it is done within the fair use as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. Internet web links to http://www.petroleumworld.com are appreciated

Copyright© 1999-2009 Petroleumworld or respective author or news agency. All rights reserved.

We welcome the use of Petroleumworld™ stories by anyone provided it mentions Petroleumworld.com as the source. Other stories you have to get authorization by its authors.Internet web links to http://www.petroleumworld.com are appreciated

Petroleumworld welcomes your feedback and comments,
share your thoughts on this article, your feed. back is important to us!

Petroleumworld News 12/05/2014

We invite all our readers to share with us
their views and comments about this article.
Follow us in : twitter / Facebook
Send this story to a friend Write to editor@petroleumworld.comBy using this link, you agree to allow PW
to publish your comments on our letters page.

Any question or suggestions,
please write to: editor@petroleumworld.com

Best Viewed with IE 5.01+ Windows NT 4.0, '95,
'98,ME,XP, Vista, Windows 7,8 +/ 800x600 pixels


 

 


Pan American Mature
Fields Congress,
Jan 20 - 22, 2015



Mexico Gas Congress
February 24-26, 2015




ow.ly/ziUh0

TOP

Editor & Publisher:Elio Ohep F./Contact Email: editor@petroleumworld.com

Contact:
editor@petroleumworld.com/ phone: Office (58 212) 635 7252,
or Cel (58 412) 996 3730 / (58 414) 276 3041 / (58  412) 952 5301


CopyRight © 1999-2010, Elio Ohep F.- All Rights Reserved. Legal Information

- CCS Office Tele
phone/Teléfonos Oficina: (58 212) 635 7252

PW in Top 100 Energy Sites


Technorati Profile


CopyRight © 1999-2010, Elio Ohep F. - All Rights Reserved.
This material may not be published, broadcast, posted online, rewritten or redistributed by any type of means, except with permission of the author/s

The information in this web site is proprietary and is protected under United States and International Copyright and Trademark laws. No part of this web site may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means whatsoever, except with permission of the author/s..

Petroleumworld encourages persons to reproduce, reprint, or broadcast Petroleumworld articles provided that any such reproduction identify the original source, http://www.petroleumworld.com or else and it is done within the fair use as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond
'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.
Any use of this site or its material, in any form, without the express prior written consent of the author, is prohibited by law and is subject to legal action. Legal Information

Top 100+

Technorati Profile
Fair use notice of copyrighted material:

This site is a public free site and it contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner.We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of business, environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have chosen to view the included information for research, information, and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from Petroleumworld or the copyright owner of the material.