Mexico



Very usefull links



PW
Bookstore





News links

AP

AFP

Aljazeera

Dow Jones

Oil price

Reuters

Bloomberg

Views and News
from
Norway

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. states opposed to offshore drilling find hope in Interior Secretary's words

 

 

 

By Nichola Groom and Timothy Gardner

LOS ANGELES/WASHINGTON
Petroleumworld 10 18 2018


Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has hinted to at least six coastal states that he will keep their waters out of a looming plan to expand U.S. offshore drilling, telling some they lack enough oil to be included anyway, according to state officials and transcripts from public hearings.

Zinke's comments are the clearest indication to date that the Trump administration's initial proposal to open nearly all U.S. waters to drilling, announced in January, will be significantly pared back by the time it is finalized. The proposal is expected later this year.

The administration had billed its initial plan as a good way to boost domestic energy production, but officials from nearly every Atlantic and Pacific coastal state opposed it on the grounds a spill would damage their multibillion-dollar tourism and fishing industries.

About 17 percent of U.S. oil and gas production now comes from offshore production, but that output is concentrated almost exclusively in the Gulf of Mexico, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Shortly after announcing the initial proposal, Zinke exempted Florida, sparking an outcry from more than a dozen other states that want to be spared too, and criticism from an oil industry keen to access new parts of the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

Zinke has since told officials from at least six states they will be “pleased” or “happy” with the final plan, that the waters off their coastlines do not have enough resources to make investment worthwhile, or both, according to the states contacted by Reuters and the hearing transcripts.

SPONSORED STORIES

They include New Hampshire, Maryland, North Carolina, Maine, Oregon and Washington.

Remaining Atlantic and Pacific coastal states have either received no assurance or did not specify to Reuters what they had been told by the Department of Interior.

In New Jersey, Democratic Governor Phil Murphy has asked for a meeting on drilling several times with Zinke but has received no response, according to a person familiar with the matter.

California and Delaware have passed laws banning offshore drilling to pre-empt the Interior Department's final plan.

Interior Department spokeswoman Heather Swift told Reuters Zinke was incorporating feedback from all states into his final proposal. She said the department did not have any new information on the timing.

“NO KNOWN RESOURCES”

In late January, Zinke met with New Hampshire's Republican Governor Chris Sununu to discuss his fears of drilling off his state's tiny 18-mile coastline. “Based on that conversation, Governor Sununu is confident that drilling off New Hampshire's coast is very unlikely,” Jayne Millerick, Sununu's chief of staff, told Reuters in an email.

Of neighboring Maine, Zinke said “there isn't any oil and gas really of significance,” and “I'm sure Maine is going to be very happy with the draft proposal.” He made those comments while under questioning during a committee hearing in April by Representative Chellie Pingree, a Democrat who opposes drilling along with Maine's three other federally elected officials — including two Republicans and one Independent.

Maine's Republican Governor Paul LePage had initially expressed support for offshore drilling, but has not followed up with Zinke on the issue, his spokeswoman Julie Rabinowitz said.

Zinke has also told anti-drilling states farther south - specifically Maryland and North Carolina - that he expects they will be pleased with his proposal.

At a Feb. 3 meeting with North Carolina Democratic Governor Roy Cooper, Zinke said it is more expensive to develop oil and gas offshore and that North Carolina lacks pipelines and ports to make it worthwhile. He said he expects North Carolina and other states “will be pleased” when the revised plan comes out, but did not offer details, Cooper's office said.

To Maryland Senator Chris Van Hollen during a Senate hearing in May, Zinke said: “I think you are going to be very happy with our planning process as we go through.”

He added Maryland had “no known resources,” a phrase he has also used under questioning by Washington Democratic Senator Maria Cantwell to describe the coastlines of Washington, Oregon and “most of California.”

The Interior Department is also in discussions with the Pentagon, which has deemed large offshore areas near Florida, Georgia and Virginia incompatible with drilling because they are used for military testing.

Defense officials told Reuters discussions about drilling in the eastern Gulf of Mexico are ongoing.

Environmental group Sierra Club, which opposes offshore drilling, said it believed the bipartisan opposition to Zinke's initial plan would keep the East and West Coasts “off limits” in the final plan.

 

SPONSORED STORIES
________________________


Story by Nichola Groom and Timothy Gardner ; Editing by Richard Valdmanis and Tom Brown from Reuters.

reuters.com 17 11 2018


We invite all our readers to share with us
their views and comments about this article.

 


Write to editor@petroleumworld.com

By using this link, you agree to allow PW
to publish your comments on our letters page.



Any question or suggestions,
please write to: editor@petroleumworld.com

Best Viewed with IE 5.01+ Windows NT 4.0, '95,
'98,ME,XP, Vista, Windows 7,8,10 +/ 800x600 pixels

Twitter: @petroleumworld1


November 13 - 15, 2018.

Gubkin University, Moscow
SPE Student Chapter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOP

Contact: editor@petroleumworld.com,

Editor & Publisher:Elio Ohep/
Contact Email: editor@petroleumworld.com

CopyRight © 1999-2016, Paul Ohep F. - All Rights Reserved. Legal Information

PW in Top 100 Energy Sites

CopyRight©1999-2017, Petroleumworld ™  / Elio Ohep - All rights reservedThis site is a public free site and it contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner.We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of business, environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have chosen to view the included information for research, information, and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission fromPetroleumworld or the copyright owner of the material.