World

 

Brazil

Mexico

Bolivia

Peru

Trinidad &
Tobago

Venezuela


Brazil

Mexico

Bolivia

Peru

Trinidad &
Tobago

Venezuela








Very usefull links



Petroleumworld
Bookstore



Institutional
links


OPEC



 


Petroleumworld
Business Partners

 


IRAQ OIL THE FORUM


Blogspots
recomended

caracas chronicles

Gustavo Coronel

Iran Watch.org

Venezuela Today

Le Blog des
Energies Nouvelles

 

 

 

 


Japan:
Workers evacuated nuclear plant, radiation in Tokyo water

Reuters/ Tokyo Electric Co

The central control room for the No. 3 reactor at the Tokyo Electric Power Co. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Tomioka, Fukushima Prefecture in northeastern Japan is pictured in a handout photo taken in September 2010 and released on March 22, 2011.

TOKYO
Petroleumworld.com, Mar 23, 2011

Workers have been evacuated after black smoke was seen emerging from Unit 3 of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in northeastern Japan, Tokyo's utility company said Wednesday.

Operators of the power station have been desperately trying to cool the reactors and spent fuel pools at the plant after it was damaged by this month's tsunami, which knocked out power to the cooling systems.

Earlier today Japanese officials issued a statement advising that tap water in Tokyo not safe for infants as it has tested two times above the limits for radioactive iodine.

It was reported early Wednesday at a news conference by the Tokyo Water Bureau said that the number of Becquerel per unit detected is 210.

The allowable level for infants is 100, while the allowable level for adults is 300.

Officials said that babies in Tokyo should not be fed tap water, but that the level is not an immediate health risk for adults.

Radiation has now seeped into vegetables, raw milk, the water supply and even seawater in the areas surrounding the plant.

Broccoli was added Wednesday to a list of tainted vegetables, now including spinach, canola and chrysanthemum greens.

Meanwhile, news this morning from the Japanese nuclear officials regarding the country's crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant is not promising.

A spokesman for the nuclear safety agency said that high-level radiation fields of 500 millisieverts/hr were detected at unit 2's turbine building a few days ago, and that is preventing workers from trying to restore the power at the control room.

At those levels a worker would reach Japan's imposed emergency exposure limit of 250 milliSv within just 30 minutes.

500 milliSv of acute exposure is also the generally accepted threshold at which individuals would begin to suffer immediate health effects.

The temperature and pressure readings in the core of unit 1 are also a major concern. The vessel is designed to a threshold of 302 degrees Celsius. Currently its external temperature is now about 400 degrees Celsius.

At those levels a worker would reach Japan's imposed emergency exposure limit of 250 milliSv within just 30 minutes.

500 milliSv of acute exposure is also the generally accepted threshold at which individuals would begin to suffer immediate health effects.

The temperature and pressure readings in the core of unit 1 are also a major concern. The vessel is designed to a threshold of 302 degrees Celsius. Currently its external temperature is now about 400 degrees Celsius.

It has been reported that the unit is not in danger of melting, but seawater is now being injected at nine times the previous rate.

That, too, has to be done very carefully, as adding water increases the pressure inside the reactor vessel. If pressure gets too high, it would likely result in the need to release of radioactive steam to reduce the pressure and avoid damage to the vessel, or even worse, an explosion.

While the hope is that power will be back on soon which will help re-establish some sense of what is really happening -- the actual conditions of the plant and all these flare-ups present their own unique dangers. This all force workers to focus on mitigating the risks as they emerge.

Additionally, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said today it will stop all milk products and vegetable and fruit products imported from the Japan's prefectures of Fukushima, Ibaraki, Tochigi and Gunma from entering the U.S. -- a response to public fears about the Fukushima nuclear plant.

This announcement comes despite the agency's repeated assurances that radiation found in foods in Japan was small, and posed no risk to the U.S. food supply.


Story by Kevin Dolan and James Hill from ABC News.

ABC News / March 23, 2011

 

 

Send this story to a friend


Copyright© 1999-2009 Petroleumworld or respective author or news agency. All rights reserved.

We welcome the use of Petroleumworld™ stories by anyone provided it mentions Petroleumworld.com as the source. Other stories you have to get authorization by its authors.

Internet web links to http://www.petroleumworld.com are appreciatedPetroleumworld welcomes your feedback and comments,
share your thoughts on this article, your feedback is important to us!We invite all our readers to share with us
their views and comments about this article.Write to editor@petroleumworld.comBy using this link, you agree to allow PW
to publish your comments on our letters page.

Any question or suggestions, please write to: editor@petroleumworld.com

Best Viewed with IE 5.01+ Windows NT 4.0, '95,
'98,ME,XP, Vista, Windows 7+/ 800x600 pixels


TOP

Contact: editor@petroleumworld.com/phone:(58 212) 635 7252, (58 412) 996 3730 or
(58  412) 952 5301

Editor:Elio C. Ohep A/Producer - Publisher:Elio Ohep /
Contact Email: editor@petroleumworld.com
CopyRight © 1999-2006, Elio Ohep - All Rights Reserved. Legal Information
- CCS office Tele
phone/Teléfonos Oficina: ( 58 212) 635 7252
PW in Top 100 Energy Sites

Technorati Profile

Fair use notice of copyrighted material:
This site is a public free site and it contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner.We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of business, environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have chosen to view the included information for research, information, and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission fromPetroleumworld or the copyright owner of the material.